HAPPY HOLIDAYS
SHIPPING ORDERS PLACED ON NOV 27,28


HAPPY HOLIDAYS
SHIPPING ORDERS PLACED ON NOV 27,28


The Do's and Don'ts of Apple Cider Vinegar for Your Hair

Apple cider vinegar is one of those magical ingredients you’ll find just about everywhere in the natural hair care world. However, it is important to stress just how powerful this ingredient is, sometimes all too powerful…


Apple Cider Vinegar is one of those praised ingredients in the natural hair community. And for good reason! Many resort to Apple Cider Vinegar for a deep cleanse, for both loose and locked hair. Though it can work wonders on your hair and scalp, it can also cause unnecessary damage when not used correctly. Let’s have a closer look at ACV, it’s properties, benefits, what could go wrong with an ACV rinse and how to effectively use ACV in your natural hair care routine. 


Apple Cider Vinegar Properties

Apple cider vinegar comes from the fermentation process of apple cider, after the (organic) apples have aged in wooden barrels. ACV has an abundance of minerals, vitamins and amino acids. It’s one of those magic potions that can be ingested directly to cure certain ailments or applied topically, directly onto the ‘problem’ area. You want to purchase whole, unfiltered, and distilled ACV with the ‘active-mother’ inside the liquid. The distilled version has little to no nutrients left inside this deliciously rich product. 



ACV Benefits for skin and hair

Apple Cider Vinegar has a pH level of around 3, and when diluted will contain similar levels to a healthy scalp. Many shampoos have high alkaline levels to actively clean out any dirt, product build-up and debris caught in the scalp and hair. However, what tends to happen with this high alkaline level is dryness, breakage and frizz because all of that ‘good’ natural oil has been rinsed from the scalp and roots. A proper ACV rinse can bring your scalp back to its natural pH level, leading to smooth, soft and healthy hair. 


ACV will also help fight dandruff, fungus, or bacterial growth on the scalp which leads to flakage and dandruff and it can also prevent hair loss. As far as the skin goes, ACV can be used for people with oily skin types, or people who are prone to acne. ACV works as an exfoliator, stimulates circulation, fights blackheads, can clear dark spots on the skin and will fight acne-causing bacteria. Not bad, eh?



What could go wrong with a deep ACV rinse

First off, you should never use ACV directly on the skin, hair or scalp without diluting it first. It’s also not a recommended remedy for those with extremely dry hair, and shouldn’t be used frequently if you are coloring your hair. 


There is also, well, the smell. Some people really can’t stand the smell of ACV, and though some resources claim the smell fades in no time after rinsing, others claim they could smell the ACV throughout the day. It’s best to dilute the ACV when using and then thoroughly rinse out the mixture. But please be careful with this mixture because as we mentioned earlier, ACV is a very powerful ingredient and can damage the scalp when not used with care. ACV is very acidic and when used too often, or too heavily can damage the hair.



How to use ACV safely and effectively on curly, kinky and coily hair

So now you’re wondering how to use ACV without burning your scalp right? A 1 parts ACV to 1 part water recipe has a pH of approximately 3 and a 1 parts ACV to13 parts water has a pH of about 4. Both options are safe when used intermittently throughout the month(s). 


  • You can either use an ACV rinse after shampooing your hair with a gentle and natural shampoo, or without shampooing the hair. 

  • Apply the mixture (say 1 tablespoon ACV to 13 tablespoons of warm water) with a spray bottle, or a slow drip bottle. Apply to damp hair. 

  • Massage into the scalp and let the mixture sit for 5-10 minutes, then rinse well. 

  • We don’t recommend doing this treatment more than once every two weeks. Experiment and observe how it works with your hair over the next months. 

Our last thoughts on ACV

We love utilizing natural ingredients, made directly from nature herself. It may come as a surprise, but there are some natural ingredients which are all too powerful and need to be handled with alchemic care. The idea is to find a rinse that improves your hair, and doesn’t damage it! So please handle with care, and no matter how serious your condition may be, try not to over-do-it. 



Has an ACV rinse worked for you? What was your experience with ACV, and what tricks have you found that improve this deep cleanse to the next level?

The Do's and Don'ts of Apple Cider Vinegar for Your Hair

Apple cider vinegar is one of those magical ingredients you’ll find just about everywhere in the natural hair care world. However, it is important to stress just how powerful this ingredient is, sometimes all too powerful…


Apple Cider Vinegar is one of those praised ingredients in the natural hair community. And for good reason! Many resort to Apple Cider Vinegar for a deep cleanse, for both loose and locked hair. Though it can work wonders on your hair and scalp, it can also cause unnecessary damage when not used correctly. Let’s have a closer look at ACV, it’s properties, benefits, what could go wrong with an ACV rinse and how to effectively use ACV in your natural hair care routine. 


Apple Cider Vinegar Properties

Apple cider vinegar comes from the fermentation process of apple cider, after the (organic) apples have aged in wooden barrels. ACV has an abundance of minerals, vitamins and amino acids. It’s one of those magic potions that can be ingested directly to cure certain ailments or applied topically, directly onto the ‘problem’ area. You want to purchase whole, unfiltered, and distilled ACV with the ‘active-mother’ inside the liquid. The distilled version has little to no nutrients left inside this deliciously rich product. 



ACV Benefits for skin and hair

Apple Cider Vinegar has a pH level of around 3, and when diluted will contain similar levels to a healthy scalp. Many shampoos have high alkaline levels to actively clean out any dirt, product build-up and debris caught in the scalp and hair. However, what tends to happen with this high alkaline level is dryness, breakage and frizz because all of that ‘good’ natural oil has been rinsed from the scalp and roots. A proper ACV rinse can bring your scalp back to its natural pH level, leading to smooth, soft and healthy hair. 


ACV will also help fight dandruff, fungus, or bacterial growth on the scalp which leads to flakage and dandruff and it can also prevent hair loss. As far as the skin goes, ACV can be used for people with oily skin types, or people who are prone to acne. ACV works as an exfoliator, stimulates circulation, fights blackheads, can clear dark spots on the skin and will fight acne-causing bacteria. Not bad, eh?



What could go wrong with a deep ACV rinse

First off, you should never use ACV directly on the skin, hair or scalp without diluting it first. It’s also not a recommended remedy for those with extremely dry hair, and shouldn’t be used frequently if you are coloring your hair. 


There is also, well, the smell. Some people really can’t stand the smell of ACV, and though some resources claim the smell fades in no time after rinsing, others claim they could smell the ACV throughout the day. It’s best to dilute the ACV when using and then thoroughly rinse out the mixture. But please be careful with this mixture because as we mentioned earlier, ACV is a very powerful ingredient and can damage the scalp when not used with care. ACV is very acidic and when used too often, or too heavily can damage the hair.



How to use ACV safely and effectively on curly, kinky and coily hair

So now you’re wondering how to use ACV without burning your scalp right? A 1 parts ACV to 1 part water recipe has a pH of approximately 3 and a 1 parts ACV to13 parts water has a pH of about 4. Both options are safe when used intermittently throughout the month(s). 


  • You can either use an ACV rinse after shampooing your hair with a gentle and natural shampoo, or without shampooing the hair. 

  • Apply the mixture (say 1 tablespoon ACV to 13 tablespoons of warm water) with a spray bottle, or a slow drip bottle. Apply to damp hair. 

  • Massage into the scalp and let the mixture sit for 5-10 minutes, then rinse well. 

  • We don’t recommend doing this treatment more than once every two weeks. Experiment and observe how it works with your hair over the next months. 

Our last thoughts on ACV

We love utilizing natural ingredients, made directly from nature herself. It may come as a surprise, but there are some natural ingredients which are all too powerful and need to be handled with alchemic care. The idea is to find a rinse that improves your hair, and doesn’t damage it! So please handle with care, and no matter how serious your condition may be, try not to over-do-it. 



Has an ACV rinse worked for you? What was your experience with ACV, and what tricks have you found that improve this deep cleanse to the next level?

By Pamela Booker 0 comment

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